Miss Stacy (arysani) wrote in bookish,
Miss Stacy
arysani
bookish

[riddle me this, bookish folks]

Just finished "Truthseeker" by C.E. Murphy...and I wasn't thrilled. I don't get it, Ms. Murphy. How can you write one FANTASTIC series and sandwich it between two mediocre-at-best ones? I mean, I'm going to read the conclusion to the "Truthseeker" duology just for closure, but...it wasn't thrilling.

Her trilogy about gargoyles and whatnot (The Negotiator trilogy) had a couple of interesting characters, but I couldn't bring myself to give a shit about the main couple. Maybe the heroine could be cool sometimes, but I got nothing when it comes to her partner-in-crime-solving-and-main-squeeze the gargoyle dude. And I know it's not because he's a gargoyle, because I crushed in a possibly unhealthy way on several of the gargoyles in the cartoon waybackwhen...

I keep thinking about that blog article I read (gotta find where I read it from - it was an io9 article, that much I'm pretty sure of) about showing vs. telling and when each are appropriate. The Walker Papers books SHOW predominantly, whereas her others TELL predominantly.

You know, I'd almost wager it was a different author entirely, they're so different. Aside from the personal investment in the characters varying wildly, in the Negotiator trilogy & in "Truthseeker" the women are feminine and have a major "look at me" quirk, whereas Jo Walker in the Walker Papers is self-confident enough not to need a "this is why I'm interesting" quirk. She feels REAL. In "Truthseeker" and the Negotiator trilogy, the leading men are...needy in some way. Whereas in the Walker Papers, the men are capable of existing outside the influence of the main female character - they are their own people who have lives and make decisions that are not entirely based on what the female leads may or may not think. The women in Negotiator trilogy & "Truthseeker" also don't really have a grasp on the consequences of their actions - they seem to exist in their own little worlds despite some pretty big stuff going on sometimes. On the other hand, while Jo Walker doesn't always grasp the consequences right away, she is very cognizant of them and of their likelihood to pop up at some time because she's not just messing around with her own life, she's messing around in the Big Kids' Sandbox. The Walker Papers have fantastic supporting characters - in the other two, I feel like I've got "this person is an awesome supporting character! They believe crazy stories and are always on the side of the heroine!" being shoved down my throat.

It's SO WEIRD.

Anyone ever encounter this before? Either with Murphy in particular or with any other author?
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  • Waking Gods, by Sylvain Neuvel

    In the sequel to Sleeping Giants, Earth is invaded by giant robots. Del Rey, 2017, 336 pages As a child Rose Franklin made an…

  • Starship's Mage

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