im_writing (im_writing) wrote in bookish,
im_writing
im_writing
bookish

The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis



Title:
The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis (Book Six of The Chronicles of Narnia)
Pages: 256
Rating: 3/5
Summary: Eustace and Jill get pulled into the world of Narnia to find and save Caspian's son, Prince Rilian.

Review: This isn't my favorite Narnia book (The Last Battle takes that spot.) I actually like this one almost the least of of them all because it's the first book that the Pevensie children aren't in (except for The Magician's Nephew but I really don't like that one.) I feel that it just kind of deterred from the rest of the series.

I like Caspian though. He's my favorite character and I like seeing some of his traits being transferred to his son, Rilian. The witch returns (thought we're ...more
This isn't my favorite Narnia book (The Last Battle takes that spot.) I actually like this one almost the least of of them all because it's the first book that the Pevensie children aren't in (except for The Magician's Nephew but I really don't like that one.) I feel that it just kind of deterred from the rest of the series.

I like Caspian though. He's my favorite character and I like seeing some of his traits being transferred to his son, Rilian. The witch returns (thought we're not specifically told if she is the White Witch or not) and I like her as a character. There is also less Aslan in this one. Aslan bothers me because I think Lewis was too obvious with the symbolism. Often Aslan's the one teaching the children and is so all-knowing that it's condescending. This story ended with the "lesson" for the children but Aslan was absent for the most part.

However, you still have the very obvious overtures of the children needing to listen to Aslan and bad things happening to them when they didn't, which grates on my nerves a little. The religious overtones of the story get a little ridiculous and overbearing and, while some of the books in the series you don't really notice, this isn't one of them. Part of the reason that I like Prince Caspian and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is because the lessons that Lewis insists on putting in his books are less prevalent.

The Silver Chair also doesn't hold quite the excitement that a lot of the other books in the series do. The Last Battle is my favorite Narnia book because it's full of a lot of action and excitement (not to mention ideas about the afterlife, which interests me to no end.) I didn't get that from The Silver Chair. It just seemed to lazily roll along and the resolution at the end seemed just too easy. The previous books the characters had to fight for their happy ending and Eustace and Jill did not have to nearly as much.

If you're reading the Chronicles of Narnia in it's entirety, then read this book because it's an important installment. However, if not, it wasn't really worth re-reading it.


Read this review and all others I write at my Goodreads Account.

Book read this year: 37
Currently Reading: The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman (in honor of Banned Books week! Not Angela's Ashes like I posted last time because I thought I was but then remembered it was BBW and decided to read a Banned Book.)

Subscribe

  • Burr, by Gore Vidal

    Aaron Burr in his own words... kind of. Random House, 1973, 430 pages Here is an extraordinary portrait of one of the most complicated -…

  • Aria: The Masterpiece, Volume 2

    Aria: The Masterpiece, Volume 2 by Kozue Amano Further life on the wet Mars, now known as Aqua. Akari helps a lost visitor, learns about the…

  • Tuscan Folk-Lore and Sketches

    Tuscan Folk-Lore and Sketches, Together with Some Other Papers by Isabella M. Anderton I read it mainly for the folk tales, which are listed up…

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 8 comments